Browsing: Hero of the week

Stained glass from the National Cathedral (Wikipedia) There is a group of men and women who rarely get the attention they merit – the military chaplains. The Army’s new Chief of Chaplains, Maj. Gen. Douglas L. Carver says, “I feel that one of the things we can do as chaplains for our Soldiers and families is to remind them that regardless of what they’re going through, wherever they are, God is there with them and prepared to carry them through any situation they’ll face. That is why chaplains are here, to remind them that they’re not alone (army.mil).” The Air…

Wesley Morgan and Gen. Petraeus My wife stumbled upon this blog written by Wesley Morgan, a Princeton Army ROTC cadet and reporter for the Daily Princetonian, who is spending a month in Iraq (note: there is some rough language in some of the articles.) It’s worth the read. His blog from Iraq can be viewed here.

(DOD) If you want to see the face of the U.S. military at war, you need look no further than Army Master Sgt. Sarun Sar. He and his 12-member squad engaged suspected insurgents near the Pakistan/Afghanistan border, coming under attack before their helicopter even landed. Sgt. Major Sar leapt out of the helicopter and ran toward the attackers. When he finally turned around, he realized he was alone – the rest of his team was pinned down near the helicopter. To make matters worse, he had attracted the attention of the bad guys, who focusesd their fire on him. So…

On August 15, 1945 (August 14 in the United States), Emperor Hirohito announced Japan’s unconditional surrender to the Allies, thus ending World War II. The war had taken a terrible toll: 60 million people were killed between 1939 and 1945, 25 million of whom were in uniform (History Channel). 16 million men and women served in the American military over the course of the war, and more 400,000 of them gave the ultimate sacrifice (WWII mem). After a wait of nearly 59 years, those who served our country in WWII were finally honored with the dedication of the National World…

(National Park Service) I was in Wal-Mart the other day, and walked past a gentleman wearing a Purple Heart baseball hat; I stopped to ask him if he was a recipient. “Yep. Korea,” he said. His name was Gordon Williams. He had been with the 1st Marine Division and was wounded in 1952. After Korea he enlisted in the Army and served two tours in Vietnam. I shook his hand, told him I’d like to hear his story someday, and thanked him for his service. A couple of days later, I received a letter in the mail. In the envelope…

If you haven’t visited the Vets for Freedom site yet, you should. In it are some great inspirational stories of our modern day heroes in action. Here’s one that you’ll love. As described in the Vets for Freedom website, “…Chontosh’s first battlefield heroics occurred in his first deployment to Iraq during the invasion and liberation of the country. On March 25, 2003, then First Lieutenant Chontosh, recognized his unit was caught in a “kill zone” on Highway One leading to Ad Diwaniyah in the initial campaign to Baghdad during Operation Iraqi Freedom. After punching his vehicle through a breech, he…

(Vets for Freedom) I was browsing through the “Vets for Freedom” website the other day, and this story caught my eye. More correctly, it took my breath away. This is the story of a Navy Corpsman who, while running to the aid of several wounded Marines, was hit by an IED. The explosion ripped off his left leg. He applied his own tourniquet, then began to drag himself toward the Marines who needed him. AK47 rounds tore into the ground, and eventually found his right leg – 5 rounds in all. He didn’t stop. When he got to the Marines…

(Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Kevin Gruenwald) It’s a well-known phrase in the military. We don’t see race, we see different shades of green or blue. In today’s world of jointness, the same can be said about inter-service support. In Iraq, where the services often fight side-by-side, they’re all a shade of green too. Late last year, Texas Army National Guard Apache helicopters flew support missions for Marines and Iraqi forces who were setting up an observation post in Ramadi. Suddenly, an IED exploded, wounding some of the Iraqis. Then another. And another. Small arms fire erupted, and the…

Tomorrow, July 12, the Medal of Honor will be 145 years old. Originally named the U.S. Army Medal of Honor, it was inspired by the Navy Medal of Valor (which had been approved the year before), and is awarded to those who, “…distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action, and other soldier-like qualities…” (History.com). Less than 3500 awards have been presented in our history. We throw the word “awe” around liberally, but it is a powerful word, and one of the few that sufficiently describes how we look at those who wear the Medal of Honor. Bravery, heroism, selflessness -…

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